Surveys, approval ratings and why they help businesses


A survey conducted earlier this year showed that Apple CEO Tim Cook has a 97 percent approval rating among the company's employees.

Earlier this year, popular job search site Glassdoor conducted a survey of employees at major companies throughout the country to gauge CEO approval ratings. Tim Cook – who took the reins at Apple after the late Steve Jobs stepped down due to his battle with pancreatic cancer – scored 97 percent.

In fact, Cook's was the highest rating any CEO in the study received. The timing of these results is also significant. Jobs was seen as a technological visionary, and consumers and industry observers questioned whether Apple would maintain its position as a cutting-edge electronics leader without him.

"While many speculated how Cook would be received by employees and how he would lead the tech giant, he seems to have settled in quite nicely, garnering a 97 percent approval," according to the study. "By comparison, when Steve Jobs stepped down in August 2011, his cumulative rating was 97 percent approval, though his rating between March 2010 and March 2011 was 95 percent."

When companies go through significant transition periods, there is a lot at stake. The public's perception of the organization and its future can affect sales, business partnerships and investor attitudes. While Cook's popularity and leadership does not currently appear to be in question with the vast majority of Apple employees, not every CEO is received the same way.

Web-survey software allows companies to conduct internal audits before such information is made public. This affords them the opportunity to identify pain points and devise strategies to address them, so that if and when an external entity conducts a similar study, there are no unwelcome surprises.

By being proactive, businesses can make sure employees – from the C-suite down to the rank and file – are onboard with company goals and the right avenues to success are being explored. Through the use of Web survey software, this can be accomplished constructively, rather than management learning of issues announced publicly before they have a chance to correct them.

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